MANTIS in Apalachicola

Since 2016, members of MANTIS Lab and CBI field crew have collaborated with the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve’s (ANERR) Megan Lamb for week-long field campaigns supported by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) subsidiary, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS). Each year, the crew gathers Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) data for one site on the main barrier island, Saint George Island, and from several sites on “Little” Saint George Island (it is the western component of the island that was split away from Saint George Island by Bob Sike’s Government Cut in 1954). The Saint George Island site is NOAA’s Unit 4 SET site while the “Little” Saint George sites include several beach profiles (D341, R4, R41, and R29) and several historical photosites (Westpass, Bayside, and Sike’s Government Cut). This data collection is part of an NGS gulf-wide research initiative to develop and improve current Relative Sea Level Rise (RSLR) models for the gulf coast by gathering high-resolution spatial (elevation) data.

Map of the eight sites surveyed annually by MANTIS, CBI, and ANERR.

Map of the eight sites surveyed annually by MANTIS, CBI, and ANERR.

A gator sunning herself on “Little” Saint George Island.

A gator sunning herself on “Little” Saint George Island.

The TLS crew setting up a base at Saint George Island.

The TLS crew setting up a base at Saint George Island.

Vapor 55 crew surveying one of the beach profiles on “Little” Saint George Island.

Vapor 55 crew surveying one of the beach profiles on “Little” Saint George Island.

Aerial View of the bay side of “Little” Saint George Island.

Aerial View of the bay side of “Little” Saint George Island.

This year’s trip began May 20th and ended May 27th and included MANTIS’ director, Michael Starek, CBI’s Research Engineering Associates, Alistair Lord and Zachary Hasdorff, MANTIS Lab Manager, Melanie Gingras, and MANTIS master’s students, Jake Berryhill and Kevin Wilson. During the week, the crew used new platforms including the Wingtra WingtraOne and Phoenix Vapor 55 as well as tried-and-true platforms from previous Apalachicola field campaigns including the DJI Mavic, DJI Pantom 4, and Riegl VZ400 Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). When georeferenced using RTK GPS control points, this data will generate point clouds that provide high spatial resolution data to monitor elevation changes as small as a couple centimeters as well as othomosaic imagery with pixel sizes on the order of 2cm GSD.

The Apalachicola field crew after their last day of field work on “Little” Saint George Island: Megan Lamb (top bow), Melanie Gingras (bottom bow), Jake Berryhill (top middle), Zachary Hasdorff (bottom middle), Alistair Lord (top stern), Kevin Wilson (middle stern), and Michael Starek (bottom stern)

The Apalachicola field crew after their last day of field work on “Little” Saint George Island: Megan Lamb (top bow), Melanie Gingras (bottom bow), Jake Berryhill (top middle), Zachary Hasdorff (bottom middle), Alistair Lord (top stern), Kevin Wilson (middle stern), and Michael Starek (bottom stern)

To see video footage from our YouTube channel:

MANTIS Achievements Spring 2019

Listed below are the achievements of MANTIS Lab for the Spring 2018 semester.

ISABEL GARCIA AWARDED ASPRS SCHOLARSHIP

In January, at the ASPRS Annual Conference MANTIS’s very own, Isabel Garcia, CMSS PhD student, won the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) 2019  Ta Liang Travel Scholarship ($2,000). Congratulations Isabel, you’ve made MANTIS proud!

CHUYEN NGUYEN DEFENDS DISSERTATION

On March 29th, Chuyen Nguyen became Dr. Chuyen Nguyen as she was award her PhD by her committee for her dissertation project titled “Development of Geodetic Imagining Techniques and Computational Approaches for Marsh Observation”. Congrats Chuyen!

MANTIS AT TEXAS CHAPTER ASBPA SYMPOSIUM

Christopher Reynolds and Kelsi Schwind of MANTIS lab attended and present at the Texas Chapter ASBPA Symposium. Kelsi Scwind gave an oral presentation on her PhD work and Chris presented a poster on his thesis project.

Christopher reynolds DEFENDS thesis

On May 2nd, Christopher Reynolds defended his thesis titled “Emerging Littoral Surveying Technologies for Coastal Resilience and Durability”. His work was supported by a Department of Defense scholarship, where he will begin work this summer. Congrats Chris and best wishes at the DoD!

Happy GIS Day from MANTIS!

Point cloud of Moody High School students who attended GIS Day.

Point cloud of Moody High School students who attended GIS Day.

For those who are not familiar with GIS—we’re surprised and happy you’re here!— GIS is a geographic information system and is designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographic data. For those who are not familiar with GIS Day, GIS Day provides an international forum for users of geographic information systems (GIS) technology to demonstrate real-world applications that are making a difference in our society.

This year’s GIS took place November 14, 2018 but the first formal GIS Day took place in 1999. Esri president and co-founder Jack Dangermond credits Ralph Nader with being the person who inspired the creation of GIS Day. He considered GIS Day a good initiative for people to learn about geography and the uses of GIS. He wanted GIS Day to be a grassroots effort and open to everyone to participate (http://www.gisday.com/).

On November 14, 2018, Del Mar College hosted its 20th GIS Day. Every year Del Mar College hosts an event at the Center for Economic Development to bring GIS professionals, land surveyors, and high school students under one roof to exchange ideas and share information. One of the most unique and arguably the most important feature of this event is the attendance of high school students to drum-up interest in this fast-growing and ubiquitously important field. MANTIS is happy to be a part of this: MANTIS staff member, Melanie Gingras, and students, Kevin Wilson, Jake Berryhill, Isabel Garcia, and Kelsi Schwind, all volunteered to assist with the latter portion of this event. Kevin Wilson demonstrated the use and application of drone technology in GIS while Jake introduced students to the FLIR sensor. Melanie, Isabel, and Kelsi presented terrestrial LiDAR function to the students in an easy-to-digest real-time scan of the attending students which are depicted in the blog images.

GIS Day point cloud of the Delmar Center for Economic Development locale.

GIS Day point cloud of the Delmar Center for Economic Development locale.